Being wizard at maths is magic for failing school

December 28, 2007

No one is going to accuse me of being a Potterite, but I have to appreciate the effect:

Being wizard at maths is magic for failing school – Times Online

Wizard-themed lessons have been introduced at Robert Mellors Primary School, in Nottingham. Children dress as their favourite Harry Potter characters, chant spells and use their wands in maths classes.

The innovative programme has been credited with transforming academic standards at the school. It has gone from being in the bottom 25 per cent of all schools three years ago to the top 25 per cent and recently received a glowing report from Ofsted.

In English, pupils are creating a screenplay from a chapter in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. In physical education they have practised balancing in a way that would allow them to climb on to a broomstick.

Tackling tricky maths problems is made easier by the spell “numerus subtracticus”, the wearing of witches’ hats and the waving of wands.

Teachers often join in with the dressing up, walking around the playground from 8.30am in full regalia.

Ms Chambers said: “They [the pupils] have studied the history of flight, written scripts and really believe in what they’re learning about. They don’t realise we’re ticking boxes in the national curriculum as well.

“It’s had a phenomenal impact on behaviour and on the whole school. Because learning is so much fun, pupils want to be engaged.

— On the day the Deathly Hallows was released, internet forums were filled with disgruntled webmasters complaining that traffic to their sites had dropped by up to 80 per cent because people were “feverishly reading the new book instead of going online”

One Response to “Being wizard at maths is magic for failing school”

  1. I like this quote: “It’s had a phenomenal impact on behaviour and on the whole school. Because learning is so much fun, pupils want to be engaged”

    Now I’m no educator, but shouldn’t that be a basic technique employed by any teacher? In my k-12 years I think I remember maybe three classes that were that way. Perhaps it’s too much work?